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Decolonizing PsychologyGlobalization, Social Justice, and Indian Youth Identities$
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Sunil Bhatia

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780199964727

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2017

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780199964727.001.0001

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Toward a Transnational Cultural Psychology

Toward a Transnational Cultural Psychology

Narrative and Social Justice in the Age of Unequal Globalization

Chapter:
(p.215) Chapter 8 Toward a Transnational Cultural Psychology
Source:
Decolonizing Psychology
Author(s):

Sunil Bhatia

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780199964727.003.0008

In this chapter, a decolonizing perspective is used to show how urban Indian youth identities across the different classes unsettle long-held beliefs about Eurocentric understandings of youth culture, identity, and subjectivities. It also shows how narrative psychology can be useful in providing a counterpoint to the depoliticized, individualistic, and universal views of culture. A vision of psychology is articulated that locates the psychological understanding of identity, cultural difference, power, and practices in neoliberal transnational contexts and reimagines the discipline of psychology in which concepts of narrative and indigenous psychology, social justice, and equity are central. It is argued that psychology has not developed a meaningful theoretical vocabulary or a willingness to explore questions of social justice that are wrapped around qualitative methods and community-based practices because these are usually conducted in faraway places with marginalized populations that have no history or recognition in American psychology or in the United States.

Keywords:   transnational cultural psychology, social justice, power, equality, indigenous psychology, globalization

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