Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
The Oxford History of the Novel in EnglishVolume 12: The Novel in Australia, Canada, New Zealand, and the South Pacific Since 1950$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Coral Ann Howells, Paul Sharrad, and Gerry Turcotte

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780199679775

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: June 2018

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780199679775.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 15 September 2019

South Pacific

South Pacific

Chapter:
(p.128) 8 South Pacific
Source:
The Oxford History of the Novel in English
Author(s):

Paul Sharrad

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780199679775.003.0011

This chapter focuses on the history of the South Pacific novel as a post-1950s phenomenon. Many Pacific writings from the early phase of literary production came in the form of ‘auto-ethnographic’ accounts of village life or the transcription of oral stories in which the separation of the writer is indicated often implicitly in the external viewpoint of the narrative and its use of formal English to depict a clearly non-Anglo world. To become a writer, one had to enter school, where he/she had to be acquainted not only with maths tables and alphabets but also new patterns of behaviour fitted to the subject position of ‘student’, disruptive of a traditional sense of communal identity. The chapter examines how literacy, with its ties to Western education, allowed Pacific Islanders to correct false representations of themselves in colonial adventure stories. It also shows that South Pacific fiction is imbued from the start with the vision of flux and fragmentation that is modernity, while contemporary shifts in Pacific identities due to the pan-Pacific diaspora and transnational networks have encouraged novelistic innovation in the increasingly pervasive print culture of a globalized Pacific.

Keywords:   modernity, South Pacific novel, village life, oral stories, literacy, Pan-Pacific diaspora, South Pacific fiction, South Pacific

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .