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Living machinesA handbook of research in biomimetics and biohybrid systems$
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Tony J. Prescott, Nathan Lepora, and Paul F.M.J Verschure

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9780199674923

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: June 2018

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780199674923.001.0001

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Biohybrid touch interfaces

Biohybrid touch interfaces

Chapter:
(p.512) Chapter 53 Biohybrid touch interfaces
Source:
Living machines
Author(s):

Sliman J. Bensmaia

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780199674923.003.0053

This chapter on biohybrid touch interfaces discusses the importance of touch in everyday life, namely in object manipulation, embodiment, and emotional communication. It then describes approaches to restore touch for individuals who have lost a limb or who have upper spinal cord injuries (SCIs) and thus have lost sensation from their limbs. One promising approach to restoring sensorimotor function in these patients is to fit them with robotic prostheses. For these limbs to be clinically viable, however, the patients must not only be able to control movements of the limb but also be able to receive sensory feedback about the consequences of the movements. Touch can be restored by interfacing with the peripheral nerve or with the brain and each approach offers promise but also faces challenges.

Keywords:   Upper-limb neuroprostheses, sensory feedback, amputation, spinal cord injury, touch interfaces

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