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Living machinesA handbook of research in biomimetics and biohybrid systems$
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Tony J. Prescott, Nathan Lepora, and Paul F.M.J Verschure

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9780199674923

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: June 2018

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780199674923.001.0001

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Emotions and self-regulation

Emotions and self-regulation

Chapter:
(p.327) Chapter 34 Emotions and self-regulation
Source:
Living machines
Author(s):

Vasiliki Vouloutsi

Paul F. M. J. Verschure

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780199674923.003.0034

This chapter takes the view that emotions of living machines can be seen from the perspective of self-regulation and appraisal. We will first look at the pragmatic needs to endow machines with emotions and subsequently describe some of the historical background of the science of emotions and its different interpretations and links to affective neuroscience. Subsequently, we argue that emotions can be cast in terms of self-regulation where they provide for a descriptor of the state of the homeostatic processes that maintain the relationship between the agent and its internal and external environment. We augment the notion of homeostasis with that of allostasis which signifies a change from stability through a fixed equilibrium to stability through continuous change. The chapter shows how this view can be used to create complex living machines where emotions are anchored in the need fulfillment of the agent, in this case considering both utilitarian and epistemic needs.

Keywords:   emotion, motivation, needs, appraisal, self-regulation, homeostasis, allostasis, human–robot interaction, James–Lange theory

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