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The Oxford English Literary HistoryVolume I: 1000-1350: Conquest and Transformation$
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Laura Ashe

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780199575381

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2017

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780199575381.001.0001

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Conquests, Kings, and Transformations

Conquests, Kings, and Transformations

Chapter:
(p.65) 2 Conquests, Kings, and Transformations
Source:
The Oxford English Literary History
Author(s):

Laura Ashe

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780199575381.003.0003

This chapter begins by considering the scattered writings produced in the decades following the Norman Conquest, and the role of their accounts of miracles and visions in re-creating a sense of English identity. It then returns to the reign of Cnut, to argue that his establishment of his rule as an ‘English’ king resolved the ideological impasse of Æthelred’s disastrous reign. Looking at the role of the Church in this crisis, it then considers the origins of the new theology of interiority and confession, and of the roots of affective piety. Turning back to kingship, it describes the patterns set in English government after the Norman Conquest, and turns toward the celebration of new secular and courtly ideals.

Keywords:   Marian miracles, Harold Godwineson, Cnut, Papal Reform, kingship, interiority, affective piety, William the Conqueror, courtliness, William II ‘Rufus’

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