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India and Civilizational FuturesBackwaters Collective on Metaphysics and Politics II$
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Vinay Lal

Print publication date: 2019

Print ISBN-13: 9780199499069

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2019

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780199499069.001.0001

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Backwater Ecstasis

Backwater Ecstasis

Truth, Destiny, and the Co-Existential Analytic

Chapter:
(p.77) 4 Backwater Ecstasis
Source:
India and Civilizational Futures
Author(s):

Roby Rajan

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780199499069.003.0004

In this chapter Rajan contends that it is not enough to oppose modern universalism by positing a culture’s specificity in contradistinction to it. Universalism can only be countered by universalism, asserts Rajan, and argues that the underlying logic of ‘progress’ in today’s global ideology is still broadly Hegelian. The central question raised in the paper is: is this the only universal story that can be told? Rajan answers this question with a resounding NO! by pointing to an unlikely source: the meta-philosophical logic of the autonomous development of Indian philosophy which emerges when the Indian dialectician T.R.V. Murti and the Japanese philosopher Gadjin Nagao are read together. Rajan christens the unfolding of this logic in a social landscape of intercommunality as ‘backwater ecsatsis’, and argues that it is only in such ecstasis that an alternative to the failed Hegelian conception of the state as the crowning accomplishment of human community is to be found.

Keywords:   community, ecstasis, co-existence, truth, destiny, universal history, Hegelian dialectics, Madhyamika dialectics

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