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Transnational Commercial Surrogacy and the (Un)Making of Kin in India$
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Anindita Majumdar

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9780199474363

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: April 2018

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780199474363.001.0001

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Matchmaking Genes

Matchmaking Genes

Assisted Conception and Kinship Information

Chapter:
(p.80) 3 Matchmaking Genes
Source:
Transnational Commercial Surrogacy and the (Un)Making of Kin in India
Author(s):

Anindita Majumdar

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780199474363.003.0003

Much of the debates on commercial surrogacy are marked by the interventions and involvement of the assisted reproductive technologies such as in vitro fertilization (IVF). In this chapter the medico-technological process of commercial surrogacy is seen through the involvement of IVF specialists, embryologists in their identification and understanding of genes and kinship. The chapter also explores the ways in which fertility clinics negotiate with the practice of commercial surrogacy by invoking Indian Council of Medical Research’s (ICMR) draft law on surrogacy and reproductive technologies. The chapter looks at how medicine does not always operate within a tradition of rationality but often invokes local-folk wisdom of kin and kinship to understand the consequences of assisted conception. In that sense IVF specialists, clinicians, and embryologists often become ‘matchmakers’ invoking an idea of genes and biology that is not embedded in scientific rationality.

Keywords:   matchmaking, egg donors, ICMR, draft bill, information, anonymity

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