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The Psychological and Cultural Foundations of East Asian CognitionContradiction, Change, and Holism$
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Julie Spencer-Rodgers and Kaiping Peng

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9780199348541

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2018

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780199348541.001.0001

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The Yin and Yang of Attitudes and Related Constructs

The Yin and Yang of Attitudes and Related Constructs

Dialectical and Holistic Influences

Chapter:
(p.383) Chapter 13 The Yin and Yang of Attitudes and Related Constructs
Source:
The Psychological and Cultural Foundations of East Asian Cognition
Author(s):

Christine Ma-Kellams

Julie Spencer-Rodgers

Kaiping Peng

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780199348541.003.0013

Much of the literature has examined how dialectical thinking influences the self, emotions, and well-being. How does dialectical thinking affect valenced evaluations of objects outside of the self? This chapter argues that naive dialecticism shapes the internal consistency, cross-situational consistency, and temporal stability of attitudes and related constructs. It begins with a discussion of how dialecticism leads to greater attitudinal ambivalence or “both-valenced” (positive/negative) evaluations of a wide variety of phenomena. It then examines how dialecticism can explain the cultural variation in ingroup favoring versus ingroup derogating tendencies. The difference between cognitive versus affective components and implicit versus explicit levels emerge as important distinctions in elucidating cultural variation in group-based attitudes. The chapter continues with a discussion of how dialecticism can account for cultural differences in cognitive dissonance, intergroup attitudes and relations, and attitude flexibility and change, and topics for future research are proposed.

Keywords:   dialectical thinking, dialecticism, ingroup/outgroup attitudes, cognitive dissonance, attitude flexibility, cultural differences

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