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The Oxford History of Historical WritingVolume 5: Historical Writing Since 1945$
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Axel Schneider and Daniel Woolf

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780199225996

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2018

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780199225996.001.0001

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Mexican Historical Writing

Mexican Historical Writing

Chapter:
(p.454) Chapter 22 Mexican Historical Writing
Source:
The Oxford History of Historical Writing
Author(s):

Guillermo Zermeño Padilla

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780199225996.003.0023

This chapter explores Mexican historical writing. One cannot understand the evolution of Mexican historiography after 1940 without taking into consideration the consolidation and political hegemony of the regime established after the Mexican Revolution in the 1930s, most notably in the government of president Lázaro Cárdenas. In addition to the international and domestic economic, political, and cultural factors, it was the convergence of exiled Spanish republican intellectuals and intellectuals of the Mexican Revolution after 1938, which ultimately sparked the appearance of academic historiography in Mexico, and whose influence still dominates the current functioning of the principal institutions of history. The chapter then describes how Mexican historiography entered a process of professionalization and institutionalization in the 1940s, leading after the 1960s to a pluralization of the fields of historical research under the influence of new Western trends such as social history.

Keywords:   Mexican historical writing, Mexican historiography, Mexican Revolution, professionalization, institutionalization, historical research, social history

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