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Growing Up in Nineteenth-Century IrelandA Cultural History of Middle-Class Childhood and Gender$
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Mary Hatfield

Print publication date: 2019

Print ISBN-13: 9780198843429

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: November 2019

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780198843429.001.0001

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Schooling Little Gentlemen

Schooling Little Gentlemen

Irish Boys’ Bourgeois and Elite Schools

Chapter:
(p.169) 5 Schooling Little Gentlemen
Source:
Growing Up in Nineteenth-Century Ireland
Author(s):

Mary Hatfield

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780198843429.003.0005

Based on primary source material from bourgeois and elite boarding schools, this chapter considers the debate on appropriate education for middle-class boys. Irish middle-class schools largely emulated the classical curriculum offered in British and Continental elite schools; however, there was a move towards offering a more practical course of studies for scholars bound for a mercantile future during the 1840s. An examination of the bourgeois school environment, the institutional construction of masculine success and failure, and the content of a manly education suggest a way of understanding adult projections of boyhood and children’s experience of a boarding school education.

Keywords:   Boarding school, elite schools, masculinity, athletics, Belfast schools, classical education, social mobility, Royal schools, Jesuit, educational ethos, boyhood, games, pedagogy

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