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The Cosmic Mystery Tour$
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Nicholas Mee

Print publication date: 2019

Print ISBN-13: 9780198831860

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2019

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780198831860.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 17 August 2019

Most of the Universe is Missing!

Most of the Universe is Missing!

Chapter:
(p.64) Most of the Universe is Missing!
Source:
The Cosmic Mystery Tour
Author(s):

Nicholas Mee

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780198831860.003.0009

Most of the matter in the universe exists in an unknown form called dark matter. All estimates of the mass of galaxies and galaxy clusters suggest they contain far more matter than is visible to us in the form of stars. Conventional explanations, such as the existence of large quantities of burnt-out stars known as MACHOs or dark gas clouds, have been ruled out. The most popular explanation is that dark matter consists of vast quantities of hypothetical stable particles known as WIMPs that were produced in vast quantities in the very early universe. Many laboratories around the world are searching for signs of these particles. These include the Italian Gran Sasso laboratory running the XENON100 experiment. Some theorists have suggested the evidence for dark matter would disappear if we had a better theory of gravity. Analysis of the Bullet Cluster indicates such proposals will not work.

Keywords:   dark matter, MACHO, WIMP, XENON100, Bullet Cluster

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