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The Cosmic Mystery Tour$
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Nicholas Mee

Print publication date: 2019

Print ISBN-13: 9780198831860

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2019

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780198831860.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 21 August 2019

Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star

Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star

Chapter:
(p.46) Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star
Source:
The Cosmic Mystery Tour
Author(s):

Nicholas Mee

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780198831860.003.0007

The emission and absorption of light by atoms produces discrete sets of spectral lines that were a vital clue to unravelling the structure of atoms and their elucidation was an important step towards the development of quantum mechanics. In the middle years of the nineteenth century Bunsen and Kirchhoff discovered that spectral lines can be used to determine the chemical composition of stars. Following Rutherford’s discovery of the nucleus, Bohr devised a model of the hydrogen atom that explained the spectral lines that it produces. His work was developed further by Pauli, who postulated the exclusion principle in order to explain the structure of other types of atom. This enabled him to explain the layout of the Periodic Table and the chemical properties of the elements.

Keywords:   Bunsen, Kirchhoff, spectrum, stars, Bohr, Pauli, exclusion principle, Periodic Table

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