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Not Quite Hope and Other Political Emotions in the Gilded Age | Oxford Scholarship Online
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Not Quite Hope and Other Political Emotions in the Gilded Age

Nathan Wolff

Abstract

Not Quite Hope and Other Political Emotions in the Gilded Age argues that late-nineteenth-century US fiction grapples with and helps to conceptualize the disagreeable feelings that are both a threat to citizens’ agency and an inescapable part of the emotional life of democracy—then as now. In detailing the corruption and venality for which the period remains known, authors including Mark Twain, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Henry Adams, and Helen Hunt Jackson evoked the depressing inefficacy of reform, the lunatic passions of the mob, and the revolting appetites of lobbyists and office seekers. Reade ... More

Keywords: affect, emotion, politics, democracy, corruption, The Gilded Age, American literature, cynicism, optimism, depression

Bibliographic Information

Print publication date: 2018 Print ISBN-13: 9780198831693
Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: February 2019 DOI:10.1093/oso/9780198831693.001.0001

Authors

Affiliations are at time of print publication.

Nathan Wolff, author
Assistant Professor of English, Tufts University