Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Critique and Utopia in Postcolonial Historical FictionAtlantic and Other Worlds$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Greg Forter

Print publication date: 2019

Print ISBN-13: 9780198830436

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: February 2019

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780198830436.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 14 December 2019

From National Bildung to Postcolonial Transnationalism

From National Bildung to Postcolonial Transnationalism

Patrick Chamoiseau’s Texaco and Kamila Shamsie’s Burnt Shadows

Chapter:
(p.182) 5 From National Bildung to Postcolonial Transnationalism
Source:
Critique and Utopia in Postcolonial Historical Fiction
Author(s):

Greg Forter

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780198830436.003.0005

This chapter links colonialism, nationalism, and transnationalism/cosmopolitanism to the genre of the Bildungsroman. The chapter’s theoretical reference points are Joseph Slaughter’s Human Rights, Inc. and Pheng Cheah’s Spectral Nationality: two influential critical works that offer incommensurate analyses of the Bildungsroman in relation to postcolonial nationalism (and the transnational). I show how Patrick Chamoiseau’s Texaco and Kamila Shamsie’s Burnt Shadows offer more fruitful accounts of these matters than both theorists. The novels complicate Cheah’s emphasis on the emancipatory potential of national Bildung by revealing the transnational assemblages that precede and exceed the nation’s formation. But they also resist the account of transnationalism identified by Slaughter, in which apparently cosmopolitan commitments disguise the continued coercions of Bildung as a disciplinary technique for subject-formation. Finally, each novel attends to the corporeal dimension of cosmopolitan solidarities and, in Shamsie’s case, links that corporeality to linguistic translation and the concept of the untranslatable.

Keywords:   transnationalism, cosmopolitanism, translation, the untranslatable, nationalism, colonialism, Joseph Slaughter, Pheng Cheah, Patrick Chamoiseau, Kamila Shamsie

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .