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Cicero, Greek Learning, and the Making of a Roman Classic$
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Caroline Bishop

Print publication date: 2019

Print ISBN-13: 9780198829423

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: December 2018

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780198829423.001.0001

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Conclusion

Conclusion

Chapter:
(p.301) Conclusion
Source:
Cicero, Greek Learning, and the Making of a Roman Classic
Author(s):

Caroline Bishop

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780198829423.003.0008

After a brief summary of the book’s argument, the conclusion turns to a consideration of how successful Cicero was in shaping his own reception as a classic. The ancient reception of Cicero’s poetry, philosophy, rhetoric, and oratory are all briefly outlined, and it is shown that the works in which Cicero evoked Greek models were among his most successful. This is because Roman literary criticism and scholarship had a powerful tendency to mimic the methods of Greek literary criticism and scholarship, and authors who had themselves mimicked Greek models were easy targets for this approach. A comparison is drawn between the ancient reception of Cicero and the ancient reception of Vergil, and the conclusion closes with the suggestion that the bids for classical immortality made by the Augustan poets (Vergil, Horace, Ovid) were modelled in part on Cicero’s successful construction of himself as a classic.

Keywords:   Cicero, Vergil, ancient scholarship, classicism, canonization, ancient literary criticism

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