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The Rise and Decline of the Post-Cold War International Order$
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Hanns W. Maull

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9780198828945

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: November 2018

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780198828945.001.0001

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The United States and Regional Security Orders in the Middle East, East Asia, and Europe

The United States and Regional Security Orders in the Middle East, East Asia, and Europe

Chapter:
(p.217) 11 The United States and Regional Security Orders in the Middle East, East Asia, and Europe
Source:
The Rise and Decline of the Post-Cold War International Order
Author(s):

Marco Overhaus

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780198828945.003.0012

The USA is still the only power with the capability to have a major impact—for better or for worse—on the security orders in all major geographical regions of the world, most notably the Near/Middle East, East Asia, and Europe. A review of the major dynamics in regional orders shows that seven decades of American hegemony have always been short of the liberal ideal-type expectations—well before Donald Trump entered the scene. However, the Trump administration sees the international and regional security orders primarily as arenas for power competition in which economic and military might are the most relevant currencies. While the erosion of regional security orders is not primarily the result of the deeds and omissions in Washington, the missing liberal hegemon will make it much harder to reverse the trend and to rebuild these orders from within and from the outside.

Keywords:   United States, regional security orders, hegemony, security, defense

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