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Censorship and the Representation of the Sacred in Nineteenth-Century England | Oxford Scholarship Online
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Censorship and the Representation of the Sacred in Nineteenth-Century England

Jan-Melissa Schramm

Abstract

In the early nineteenth century, the biblical sublime found expression in the visual arts, the novel, the oratorio, and poetry, but spoken drama remained secular by force of precedent and law. The maintenance of this ban on religious theatrical representation was underpinned by Protestant anxieties about impersonation, performance, and the power of the image that persisted long after the Reformation. But by mid-century, the turn towards medievalism in visual culture, antiquarianism in literary history, and the ‘popular’ in constitutional reform placed England’s pre-Reformation past at the cent ... More

Keywords: the body, censorship, eighteenth-century literature, incarnation, law, nineteenth-century literature, Reformation, sacrifice, theatre, visual art

Bibliographic Information

Print publication date: 2019 Print ISBN-13: 9780198826064
Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: June 2019 DOI:10.1093/oso/9780198826064.001.0001

Authors

Affiliations are at time of print publication.

Jan-Melissa Schramm, author
Lecturer in Nineteenth-Century Literature, University of Cambridge, and Fellow in English, Trinity Hall, Cambridge