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Masculine PluralQueer Classics, Sex, and Education$
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Jennifer Ingleheart

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9780198819677

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2018

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780198819677.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 14 October 2019

Conclusion

Conclusion

Queer Classics

Chapter:
(p.295) Conclusion
Source:
Masculine Plural
Author(s):

Jennifer Ingleheart

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780198819677.003.0007

The conclusion explores the wider implications of the argument of this book, and of the study of Bainbriggean classicism, or Queer Classics. The most queer Classical Receptions look to Rome for a range of transgressive models of sexual desire and pleasure, rather than turning to Greece to apologize for same-sex love. In private writings, Bainbrigge and others are free to focus on sex and its role in the ancient and modern worlds. Queer classicists are fascinated by the body—the ancient body and the pleasures it experienced, as well as the modern embodiment of classical education. Queer classicists remind us that the body and sexuality cannot be separated from the study of Classics—an important insight for a discipline in which expurgation of (homo)sexual material in classical texts at school is still all too common.

Keywords:   Queer Classics, Rome, transgressive, private writing, the body, embodiment of classical education, Classical Reception

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