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Mitonuclear Ecology$
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Geoffrey E. Hill

Print publication date: 2019

Print ISBN-13: 9780198818250

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: June 2019

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780198818250.001.0001

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Forms and consequences of incompatibility

Forms and consequences of incompatibility

Chapter:
(p.20) 2 Forms and consequences of incompatibility
Source:
Mitonuclear Ecology
Author(s):

Geoffrey E. Hill

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780198818250.003.0002

To understand the evolutionary consequences of poor coadaptation of mitochondrial and nuclear genes, it is necessary to consider in molecular detail the manifestations of mitochondrial dysfunction. Most considerations of mitochondrial dysfunction resulting from mitonuclear incompatibilities focus on protein–protein interactions in the electron transport system, but the interactions of mitochondrial and nuclear genes in enabling the transcription, translation, and replication of mitochondrial DNA can play an equally important role in mitonuclear coevolution and coadaptation. This chapter reviews the extensive literature on how mitochondrial dysfunction is the cause of many inherited human diseases and explains how this biomedical literature connects to a rapidly growing body of research on the evolution and maintenance of coadaptation of mitochondrial and nuclear genes among non-human eukaryotes. The goal of the chapter is to establish the fundamental importance of coadaptation between co-functioning mitochondrial and nuclear genes.

Keywords:   Electron transport chain, quantum tunneling, mitochondrial disease, cybrid cell, anterograde signaling, retrograde signaling, somatic cell nuclear transfer, mitochondrial replacement therapy, hybrid cross, hybrid backcross

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