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James Joyce's America$
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Brian Fox

Print publication date: 2019

Print ISBN-13: 9780198814023

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: April 2019

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780198814023.001.0001

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The New World Presses

The New World Presses

Joyce and American Popular Culture

Chapter:
(p.61) 2 The New World Presses
Source:
James Joyce's America
Author(s):

Brian Fox

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780198814023.003.0002

Chapter 2 examines allusions to American popular culture in Joyce’s work. A potentially voluminous subject given the sheer range of references, the chapter narrows it down to areas which show a continued engagement across Joyce’s works. One of the most significant examples of this is blackface minstrelsy. Indeed, Joyce, it would appear, is particularly drawn to a specific kind of American popular culture, one with a strong sense of a connection with a history of colonialism, empire, and race. Within this framework, Joyce appropriates and renegotiates Irish relations to not only blackface minstrels, but also the Mutt and Jeff comic strip, Hollywood movies, Broadway musicals, cowboys and Indians, jazz, flappers, speakeasies, and myriad other markers of American popular culture.

Keywords:   American popular culture, blackface minstrelsy, Hollywood, colonialism, empire, race

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