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Algebraic ArtMathematical Formalism and Victorian Culture$
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Andrea Henderson

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9780198809982

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2018

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780198809982.001.0001

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Analysis

Analysis

Magic Mirrors: Formalist Realism in Victorian Physics and Photography

Chapter:
(p.93) 3 Analysis
Source:
Algebraic Art
Author(s):

Andrea Henderson

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780198809982.003.0004

This chapter argues that British photography of the 1850s and 60s wedded realism—understood as a commitment to descriptive truthfulness—with formalism, or a belief in the defining power of structural relationships. Photographers at mid-century understood the realistic character of photography to be grounded in more than fidelity to detail; the technical properties of the medium accorded perfectly with the claims of contemporary physicists that reality itself was constituted by spatial arrangements and polar forces rather than essential categorical distinctions. The photographs of Clementina, Lady Hawarden exemplify this formalist realism, dramatizing the power of the formal logic of photography not only to represent the real but to reveal its fundamentally formal nature.

Keywords:   Clementina Hawarden, Victorian photography, Sir John Herschel, polar opposition, light, Victorian physics, mirrors, Lewis Carroll

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