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Dramatic GeographyRomance, Intertheatricality, and Cultural Encounter in Early Modern Mediterranean Drama$
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Laurence Publicover

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780198806813

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2017

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780198806813.001.0001

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This Carthage, Sirs, was Venice

This Carthage, Sirs, was Venice

What is Intertheatrical Geography?

Chapter:
(p.87) 3 This Carthage, Sirs, was Venice
Source:
Dramatic Geography
Author(s):

Laurence Publicover

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780198806813.003.0004

This short chapter discusses the origin of the critical term ‘intertheatricality’ and asks how it can be used to think about early modern dramatic geography. Employing the surviving manuscript of Philip Massinger’s Believe as You List as a symbol for how intertheatrical geography operates, the chapter makes the argument for a more author-centred approach to the study of intertheatricality than has been common within existing scholarship. Finally, it discusses the relationship between romance and intertheatricality, arguing that early modern playwrights staging the Mediterranean constructed that geographical space not simply through one another’s plays, but moreover through engagements with one another’s romance strategies.

Keywords:   intertheatricality, Believe as You List, romance, intertheatrical geography, palimpsest

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