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Consent and Control in the Authoritarian WorkplaceRussia and China Compared$
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Martin Krzywdzinski

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9780198806486

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: March 2018

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780198806486.001.0001

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Conclusions

Conclusions

Chapter:
(p.251) 7 Conclusions
Source:
Consent and Control in the Authoritarian Workplace
Author(s):

Martin Krzywdzinski

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780198806486.003.0007

This chapter summarizes the findings of the study. It takes the empirical results of Chapter 3 as its point of departure; although the institutional environment in Russia formally provides better possibilities for the workforce to articulate its demands than is the case in China, at the same time, the Russian automobile plants have significantly greater problems with the generation of consent. This chapter reveals a somewhat surprising face of factory regimes in the Chinese plants, one that combines controlled employee voice, extensive socialization activities, and at the same time, a strong competitive orientation. By contrast, the findings on the Russian plants show the consequences of a system that, while formally accepting employee voice, also creates a culture shaped by corruption, mistrust, and punishment-oriented leadership styles. The chapter concludes with a look ahead and discusses what the consent-generating micromechanisms analyzed here reveal about the functioning of the two societies and economies.

Keywords:   Russia, China, consent, factory regimes, culture, institutions, labor regulation, authoritarianism

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