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International Law and ReligionHistorical and Contemporary Perspectives$
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Martti Koskenniemi, Mónica García-Salmones Rovira, and Paolo Amorosa

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780198805878

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2017

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780198805878.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 17 November 2019

John Selden and the Jewish Religious Fountainhead of the International Law of the Sea

John Selden and the Jewish Religious Fountainhead of the International Law of the Sea

Chapter:
(p.111) 5 John Selden and the Jewish Religious Fountainhead of the International Law of the Sea
Source:
International Law and Religion
Author(s):

Ofir Haivry

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780198805878.003.0006

Modern international maritime law (IML) was born primarily out of two works, written about 400 years ago: Mare Liberum (1609) by Hugo Grotius, which argued for a complete freedom of the seas; and Mare Clausum (1635), by John Selden (1584–1654) arguing for the principle and practice of dominion and ownership over tracts of sea. Until relatively recently IML tended far more towards Grotius, since technological limitations limited application of Selden’s view mainly to the concept of the ‘territorial waters’. However, in the last three decades, as technological advances enable the establishment of far wider areas of maritime control and ever more ambitious finds of resources lying under the sea-bed, there has been a dramatic rise in the import of John Selden’s ideas for IML.

Keywords:   John Selden, maritime law, international law, law of the sea, Mare Clausum, Hebraism, Noahide, Territorial Waters, Exclusive Economic Zone, Jewish law

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