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Hellenism and the Local Communities of the Eastern Mediterranean400 BCE-250 CE$
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Boris Chrubasik and Daniel King

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780198805663

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: August 2017

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780198805663.001.0001

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Converging Perspectives on Antiochos III

Converging Perspectives on Antiochos III

Chapter:
(p.111) 6 Converging Perspectives on Antiochos III
Source:
Hellenism and the Local Communities of the Eastern Mediterranean
Author(s):

Johannes Haubold

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780198805663.003.0006

This chapter compares three texts about the Seleukid monarch Antiochos III: a decree of the Seleukid Greek city of Teos published shortly before the king’s war with Rome; a description of his conduct of the war written by the pro-Roman historian Polybios; and a cuneiform text from Babylon about Antiochos’ visit to the city just after the war. I argue that, despite differences in style, cultural background, historical context, and political allegiance, these texts converge around key themes of Seleukid imperial discourse, such as the king as benefactor and the importance of the royal couple. The chapter thus serves as a corrective to recent scholarship that tends to stress the differences between Greek and non-Greek perspectives on the Seleukid kings.

Keywords:   Antiochos III, Teos, Polybios, Astronomical Diaries, Babylon, Nebuchadnezzar II, Chaldaeans, royal benefaction

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