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The World of Prostitution in Late Imperial Austria$
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Nancy M. Wingfield

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780198801658

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: July 2017

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780198801658.001.0001

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Clandestine Prostitutes

Clandestine Prostitutes

Women of the Streets, their Pimps, the Vice Police, and the Public

Chapter:
(p.137) 5 Clandestine Prostitutes
Source:
The World of Prostitution in Late Imperial Austria
Author(s):

Nancy M. Wingfield

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780198801658.003.0005

Clandestine prostitutes, who constituted the greatest number of prostitutes in large cities, were also part of the social fabric in less urban areas, where they sometimes caused insufficient nuisance to warrant sustained police attention. The term “clandestine,” which Austrian vice police, reformers, and other commentators used as if it were self-evident, was broadly employed. In addition to women who regularly walked the streets, the term encompassed women who occasionally or temporarily engaged in commercial sex to augment their low-paid employment, did not necessarily consider themselves prostitutes, and did not want to attract police attention. They were part of a wider working-class community, into which they disappeared when not engaged in clandestine prostitution. The relative ease with which these women could move in and out of social identities helps explain why few of them were willing to register with vice police and be stigmatized as a prostitutes.

Keywords:   clandestine prostitution, Leopoldstadt, park, pimp, Prague, Prater, Pratermädchen, violence

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