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Rules without RightsLand, Labor, and Private Authority in the Global Economy$
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Tim Bartley

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9780198794332

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: March 2018

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780198794332.001.0001

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A Substantive Theory of Transnational Governance

A Substantive Theory of Transnational Governance

Chapter:
(p.37) 2 A Substantive Theory of Transnational Governance
Source:
Rules without Rights
Author(s):

Tim Bartley

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780198794332.003.0002

Social scientists have theorized the rise of transnational private authority, but knowledge about its consequences remains sparse and fragmented. This chapter builds from a critique of “empty spaces” imagery in several leading paradigms to a new theory of transnational governance. Rules and assurances are increasingly flowing through global production networks, but these flows are channeled and reconfigured by domestic governance in a variety of ways. Abstracting from the case studies in this book, a series of theoretical propositions specify the likely outcomes of private regulation, the influence of domestic governance, the special significance of territory and rights, and several ways in which the content of rules shapes their implementation. As such, this theory proposes an explanation for differences across places, fields, and issues, including the differential performance of labor and environmental standards.

Keywords:   theory, regulatory void, world society, orchestration, global production networks, transnational fields, global standards, compliance, labor, environment

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