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Thomas FullerDiscovering England's Religious Past$
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W. B. Patterson

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9780198793700

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: March 2018

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780198793700.001.0001

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Education

Education

The Study of History and Theology

Chapter:
(p.11) 1 Education
Source:
Thomas Fuller
Author(s):

W. B. Patterson

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780198793700.003.0002

Thomas Fuller, born in 1608 in Aldwincle, Northamptonshire, was the son of Thomas Fuller, the minister of St. Peter’s Church in Aldwincle. His mother Margaret’s brother was John Davenant, the president of Queens’ College, Cambridge, who became bishop of Salisbury shortly after Fuller entered Cambridge. The curriculum there emphasized Latin and Greek literature, partly as a result of the residence and teaching of Erasmus, the eminent Renaissance scholar, in the early sixteenth century. Fuller contended, in an essay published in 1642, that the “general Artist,” or university graduate in the arts, completed his academic endeavors with the study of history, enabling him to understand a broad range of human experience. Fuller studied theology under Samuel Ward, the master of Sidney Sussex College, a close friend of Bishop Davenant. His education prepared him well for his calling as a church historian.

Keywords:   arts curriculum, Renaissance, Erasmus, John Davenant, Samuel Ward

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