Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
The Changing Face of Volunteering in Hospice and Palliative Care$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Ros Scott and Steven Howlett

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9780198788270

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: June 2018

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780198788270.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 17 February 2020

Volunteering in the United States of America

Volunteering in the United States of America

Chapter:
(p.112) Chapter 9 Volunteering in the United States of America
Source:
The Changing Face of Volunteering in Hospice and Palliative Care
Author(s):

Greg Schneider

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780198788270.003.0009

Hospice and palliative care volunteering in the United States of America (USA) has changed dramatically since its inception in the late 1960s. Inspired by physician Dame Cicely Saunders, the modern hospice movement officially began in the USA in 1971 with Florence Wald founding the first hospice, Hospice, Inc., a non-profit in New Haven, Connecticut. Then in 1983, the US Congress established the Medicare Hospice Benefit, whose Conditions of Participation (CoPs) mandated that volunteers must provide administrative or direct patient care in an amount that, at a minimum, equals 5 per cent of the total patient care hours expended by all paid hospice employees and contract staff. Hence, every hospice programme must have a volunteer programme in order to receive reimbursement for services rendered. The primary forces currently shaping hospice and palliative care volunteering have been regulations, care quality, skill requirements, liability concerns, and changing business objectives in a highly competitive environment.

Keywords:   volunteer, volunteer conditions of participation, hospice 5 per cent rule, volunteer coordinator, volunteer training

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .