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Evolutionary Ecology of Marine Invertebrate Larvae$
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Tyler Carrier, Adam Reitzel, and Andreas Heyland

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780198786962

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2018

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780198786962.001.0001

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Evolutionary Ecology of Parental Investment and Larval Diversity

Evolutionary Ecology of Parental Investment and Larval Diversity

Chapter:
(p.34) Chapter 3 Evolutionary Ecology of Parental Investment and Larval Diversity
Source:
Evolutionary Ecology of Marine Invertebrate Larvae
Author(s):
Dustin Marshall, Justin McAlister, Adam Reitzel
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780198786962.003.0003

Marine larvae vary enormously in the amount of care (be it in the form of energy or other costly caregiving that increases offspring fitness) they receive from their parents. In contrast to terrestrial taxa, parental investment is less coupled to phylogeny in marine taxa, such that closely related species may have wildly different parental investment strategies. Such diversity demands explanation, and marine biologists have been fascinated by variation in parental investment for over 100 years. In this chapter, we review patterns in parental investment in space, review the theory of parental investment in life history theory, explore the key assumptions of life history theory as it pertains to parental investment, and then examine the evolutionary causes and ecological consequences of variation in parental investment for marine organisms.

Keywords:   egg size, maternal effect, transgenerational plasticity, life history theory, parental investment

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