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Evolutionary Ecology of Marine Invertebrate Larvae$
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Tyler Carrier, Adam Reitzel, and Andreas Heyland

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780198786962

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2018

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780198786962.001.0001

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I Feel That! Fluid Dynamics and Sensory Aspects of Larval Settlement across Scales

I Feel That! Fluid Dynamics and Sensory Aspects of Larval Settlement across Scales

Chapter:
(p.190) Chapter 13 I Feel That! Fluid Dynamics and Sensory Aspects of Larval Settlement across Scales
Source:
Evolutionary Ecology of Marine Invertebrate Larvae
Author(s):
Jason Hodin, Matthew C. Ferner, Andreas Heyland, Brian Gaylord
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780198786962.003.0013

A commonality among oceanic life cycles is a process known as settlement, where dispersing propagules transition to the sea floor. For many marine invertebrates, this transition is irreversible, and therefore involves a crucial decision-making process through which larvae evaluate their juvenile habitat-to-be. In this chapter, we consider aspects of the external environment that could influence successful settlement. Specifically, we discuss water flow across scales, and how larvae can engage behaviors to influence where ocean currents take them, and enhance the likelihood of their being carried toward suitable settlement locations. Next, we consider what senses larvae utilize to evaluate their external environment and properly time such behavioral modifications, and settlement generally. We hypothesize that larvae integrate these various external cues in a hierarchical fashion, with differing arrangements being employed across ontogeny and among species. We conclude with a brief discussion of the future promises of larval biology, ecology, and evolution.

Keywords:   settlement, metamorphosis, sensory ecology, hydrodynamics, larval transport, turbulence, recruitment

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