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Monetary Policy in Sub-Saharan Africa$
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Andrew Berg and Rafael Portillo

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9780198785811

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: April 2018

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780198785811.001.0001

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Implementation Errors and Incomplete Information

Implementation Errors and Incomplete Information

Implications for the Effects of Monetary Policy in Low-Income Countries

Chapter:
(p.163) Chapter 9 Implementation Errors and Incomplete Information
Source:
Monetary Policy in Sub-Saharan Africa
Author(s):

Rafael Portillo

Filiz Unsal

Stephen O’Connell

Catherine Pattillo

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780198785811.003.0009

This chapter shows that limited effects of monetary policy can reflect shortcomings of existing policy frameworks in low-income countries rather than (or in addition to) the structural features often put forward in policy and academic debates. The chapter focuses on two pervasive issues: lack of effective frameworks for implementing policy, so that short-term interest rates display considerable unintended volatility, and poor communication about policy intent. The authors introduce these features into an otherwise standard New Keynesian model with incomplete information. Implementation errors result from insufficient accommodation to money demand shocks, creating a noisy wedge between actual and intended interest rates. The representative private agent must then infer policy intentions from movements in interest rates and money. Under these conditions, even exogenous and persistent changes in the stance of monetary policy can have weak effects, even when the underlying transmission (as might be observed under complete information) is strong.

Keywords:   Incomplete information, money targeting, monetary policy, low-income countries, developing countries, monetary policy transmission

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