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The Chivalric TurnConduct and Hegemony in Europe before 1300$
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David Crouch

Print publication date: 2019

Print ISBN-13: 9780198782940

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: July 2019

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780198782940.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 20 November 2019

The Table

The Table

Chapter:
(p.175) 9 The Table
Source:
The Chivalric Turn
Author(s):

David Crouch

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780198782940.003.0009

Dining within European halls already respected a universal sequence and culture by 1100, which was further homogenized by institutions such as the fostering abroad of adolescent males and the lavish entertaining of the mobile tourneying society of France and the western Empire. The conduct of the table at dinner was the central ritual of courtly society and generated a considerable instructional literature across the continent. It was also a major stress point in society, with reputations of hosts depending on their lavish hospitality and the efficiency of their servants, while the social fortunes of their guests depended on confident performances at table as guests, raconteurs and entertainers. Dangers included overindulgence in alcohol, gauging the degree of deference, the control of body and posture, as well as any failure in contributing to general entertainment.

Keywords:   dinners, banquets, table manners, commensality, education, servants, drunkenness, deference, posture, self-control

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