Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Hegel's Political PhilosophyOn the Normative Significance of Method and System$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Thom Brooks and Sebastian Stein

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780198778165

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: June 2017

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780198778165.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 15 December 2019

To Know and Not Know Right

To Know and Not Know Right

Hegel on Empirical Cognition and Philosophical Knowledge of Right

Chapter:
(p.161) 8 To Know and Not Know Right
Source:
Hegel's Political Philosophy
Author(s):

Sebastian Stein

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780198778165.003.0009

This chapter discusses the epistemological status of the knowledge claims Hegel makes in the Philosophy of Right. It distinguishes between empirical knowledge (EK), potentially conditioned knowledge (PCPK), and philosophical knowledge (PK), and argues that PK is immune to criticism based on EK and PCPK because it is ontological prior to them. From ‘our’, PCPK-style perspective, Hegel might have failed truthfully to express PK so for ‘us’, his claims as well as our own are open for revision by the always already present standard of PK. Insofar as Hegel failed to express PK and we succeed, true thought is manifest and recognizes itself in ‘our’ thinking. When this happens, PK replaces PCPK and the contradiction between PK and PCPK is avoided.

Keywords:   Hegel, philosophy of right, method, system, empirical knowledge, cognition, philosophical knowledge, German Idealism

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .