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Scribal Repertoires in Egypt from the New Kingdom to the Early Islamic Period$
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Jennifer Cromwell and Eitan Grossman

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780198768104

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: February 2018

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780198768104.001.0001

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Copyist and Scribe: Two Professions for a Single Man?

Copyist and Scribe: Two Professions for a Single Man?

Palaeographical and Linguistic Observations on Some Practices of the Theban Region According to Coptic Texts from the Seventh and Eighth Centuries

Chapter:
(p.274) 13 Copyist and Scribe: Two Professions for a Single Man?
Source:
Scribal Repertoires in Egypt from the New Kingdom to the Early Islamic Period
Author(s):

Anne Boud’hors

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780198768104.003.0013

Newly discovered or published Coptic documents on papyrus or ostraca have shed light on the written production of two characters from the Theban region (Upper Egypt), namely the priest Mark (early seventh century) and the monk Frange (c.725), whose writings are here compared. Their hands, as well as their language use and the content of their writings, indicate significant differences that can be considered in relation to several factors: level of education and culture, social condition, and the general evolution of the Coptic language towards a state of decreased standardization. Only the priest Mark really combines both activities of notary and copyist, thus demonstrating an exceptional influence.

Keywords:   Coptic, Greek, manuscripts, ostraca, standard, writing

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