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Biology and Conservation of Musteloids$
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David W. Macdonald, Chris Newman, and Lauren A. Harrington

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780198759805

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2018

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780198759805.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 02 June 2020

Quantifying loss and degradation of former American marten habitat due to the impacts of forestry operations and associated road networks in northern Idaho, USA

Quantifying loss and degradation of former American marten habitat due to the impacts of forestry operations and associated road networks in northern Idaho, USA

Chapter:
(p.292) Chapter 12 Quantifying loss and degradation of former American marten habitat due to the impacts of forestry operations and associated road networks in northern Idaho, USA
Source:
Biology and Conservation of Musteloids
Author(s):

Samuel A. Cushman

Tzeidle N. Wasserman

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780198759805.003.0012

American marten are associated with extensive and unfragmented late seral forest habitats, and are often considered to be particularly vulnerable to habitat loss and fragmentation. This chapter evaluates the impact of road building and timber harvest on habitat suitability for marten in northern Idaho, USA, using an empirically derived, multi-scale habitat suitability model, reconstructing key predictor variables (elevation, forest type, road density, canopy cover, landscape fragmentation and the extensiveness of late seral forest in the landscape) as they appear to have existed prior to harvest, and applying the model to both current and pre-harvest conditions. Calculating changes in the extent and pattern of habitat in the landscape indicate that timber harvest and road construction together reduced marten habitat quality considerably across the study area, which is likely responsible for current patterns of reduced detection rates and lower genetic diversity in areas that have experienced the largest amounts of habitat loss.

Keywords:   American marten, forest habitats, habitat loss, landscape fragmentation, road building, timber harvest

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