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Anti-Politics, Depoliticization, and Governance$
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Paul Fawcett, Matthew Flinders, Colin Hay, and Matthew Wood

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780198748977

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2017

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780198748977.001.0001

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Multilevel Governance and Depoliticization

Multilevel Governance and Depoliticization

Chapter:
(p.134) 7 Multilevel Governance and Depoliticization
Source:
Anti-Politics, Depoliticization, and Governance
Author(s):

Yannis Papadopoulos

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780198748977.003.0007

‘Multilevel’ governance (MLG) refers to the fact that, in contemporary established democracies, collectively binding decisions are frequently formulated or implemented in a cooperative manner by networks composed of public actors attached to different jurisdictional levels (from the local to the supranational) and of non-public actors such as experts, interest representatives, and members of cause groups. This chapter develops the expectation that the occurrence and magnitude of depoliticization in MLG depend on a number of its defining traits, and that the presence and intensity of these traits depend in turn on the specific empirical configuration and actor constellation of governance arrangements. The chapter first lays out the relationships that may exist between different facets of depoliticization in MLG, and then explores how MLG is depoliticized when technocratic rule, deficits of representation, lack of political control, and lack of public debate tend to prevail.

Keywords:   multilevel governance, depoliticization, technocracy, representation, pluralism, shadow of hierarchy, fire alarm, public debate

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