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A Magnificent FaithArt and Identity in Lutheran Germany$
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Bridget Heal

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780198737575

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2017

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780198737575.001.0001

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Protestant Aesthetics beyond the Court

Protestant Aesthetics beyond the Court

Chapter:
(p.219) 8 Protestant Aesthetics beyond the Court
Source:
A Magnificent Faith
Author(s):

Bridget Heal

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780198737575.003.0009

While princely residential cities such as Dresden provided key focal points for the Empire’s spiritual and cultural life during the later seventeenth century, Chapter 8 shows that the appeal of the Lutheran baroque extended well beyond courtly circles. Not only princes and nobles but also prosperous burghers commissioned magnificent churches and religious images, as the examples investigated here demonstrate. The chapter uses case studies from two Saxon territories, the Erzgebirge and Upper Lusatia, to suggest that wherever finances permitted churches were rebuilt or redecorated in the new style, employing visual magnificence in the service of Lutheran piety. There were some splendid monuments in Brandenburg as well, for example Andreas Schlüter’s pulpit for Berlin’s Marienkirche (1703). There, however, Lutheran culture was also shaped by the presence of Calvinists and Pietists.

Keywords:   Saxony, Erzgebirge, Upper Lusatia, baroque, Brandenburg-Prussia, Berlin, Andreas Schlüter, Pietism, Philipp Jakob Spener, August Hermann Francke

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