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Party and DemocracyThe Uneven Road to Party Legitimacy$
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Piero Ignazi

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780198735854

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2017

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780198735854.001.0001

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Party Standstill in an Era of Change

Party Standstill in an Era of Change

Chapter:
(p.139) 5 Party Standstill in an Era of Change
Source:
Party and Democracy
Author(s):

Piero Ignazi

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780198735854.003.0006

Chapter 5 discusses the premises of the emergence of the cartel party with the parties’ resilience to any significant modification in the face of the cultural, societal, and political changes of the 1970s–1980s. Parties kept and even increased their hold on institutions and society. They adopted an entropic strategy to counteract challenges coming from a changing external environment. A new gulf with public opinion opened up, since parties demonstrated greater ease with state-centred activities for interest-management through collusive practices in the para-governmental sector, rather than with new social and political options. The emergence of two sets of alternatives, the greens and the populist extreme right, did not produce, in the short run, any impact on intra-party life. The chapter argues that the roots of cartelization reside mainly in the necessitated interpenetration with the state, rather than on inter-party collusion. This move has caught parties in a legitimacy trap.

Keywords:   party self-confidence, party entropy, new parties, greens, populist extreme right, delinking from society, cartel party, party collusion, interpenetration with the state

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