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Anglo-Papal Relations in the Early Fourteenth CenturyA Study in Medieval Diplomacy$
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Barbara Bombi

Print publication date: 2019

Print ISBN-13: 9780198729150

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2019

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780198729150.001.0001

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Representatives and Proctors

Representatives and Proctors

Chapter:
(p.102) 5 Representatives and Proctors
Source:
Anglo-Papal Relations in the Early Fourteenth Century
Author(s):

Barbara Bombi

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780198729150.003.0005

Diplomatic representatives and proctors were responsible for managing and shaping the written and oral communication among polities and were to different degrees involved in actual diplomatic missions. The changing domestic and international political circumstances and conflicts that characterized the first decade of Edward III’s reign between 1327 and 1339 led to the increasing specialization of administrative and diplomatic personnel in England and in other leading European polities. We therefore ought to focus on ‘teams of representatives and agents’ with complementary specializations rather than on individuals. In this chapter I exemplify through the means of relevant case studies how between 1306 and 1360 the Anglo-papal diplomatic discourse was managed owing to teams of agents and representatives, firstly focusing on the English representatives at the papal curia and then moving on to papal envoys in England.

Keywords:   diplomacy, envoys, representatives, proctors, ambassadors, England, papacy, papal legates, nuncios, Hundred Years’ War

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