Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
The Bible and FeminismRemapping the Field$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Yvonne Sherwood

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780198722618

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2018

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780198722618.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use (for details see www.oxfordscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 23 May 2019

‘But I Still Read The Bible!’

‘But I Still Read The Bible!’

Post-Christian Women’s Biblicalism

Chapter:
(p.569) Chapter 31 ‘But I Still Read The Bible!’
Source:
The Bible and Feminism
Author(s):

Dawn Llewellyn

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780198722618.003.0032

While it might be assumed that post-Christian women have rejected the sacred texts of Christianity, this chapter highlights their continued use of the Bible to resource their spiritual lives, and in doing so raises two questions for gendered religious reading practices. First, post-Christian women’s biblicalism crosses the distinction between sacred and secular literatures, and reading processes sometimes made in religious feminisms. Second, despite the emphasis on ‘women’s experience’, feminist theology has focused on the text to the extent that actual readers and their spiritual reading practices are often overlooked. Yet, qualitatively interviewing post-Christian women reveals the biblical reading and the ‘filtering’ strategies they employ to monitor their use of the Bile. This questions the assumption that women who use literature as a spiritual resource are doing so because they have found the Christian testaments lacking in opportunities to access the divine and have therefore excluded them from their personal collections of spiritual texts. While post-Christian women readers in this study are critical of scripture and question its relevancy, they are still reading the Bible.

Keywords:   post-Christian women, Bible reading, implied reader, real reader, filtering

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .