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The Bible and FeminismRemapping the Field$
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Yvonne Sherwood

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780198722618

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2018

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780198722618.001.0001

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A Foolish King, Women, and Wine

A Foolish King, Women, and Wine

A Dangerous Cocktail from Lemuel’s Mother

Chapter:
(p.315) Chapter 17 A Foolish King, Women, and Wine
Source:
The Bible and Feminism
Author(s):

Mercedes L. García Bachmann

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780198722618.003.0018

Proverbs 31:1–9 is a mother’s teaching to her son, King Lemuel, on administration of one’s life (what and whom not to spend one’s strength on), on royal justice (it is not for kings to drink, lest they forget righteousness), and on strong drink for those who need to forget. Studies deal generally with the issue of wine or justice, leaving out vs. 1–3, her first words. A feminist study looks at the dynamics of female wisdom, evident in Lemuel’s Mother, but also at matters of gender solidarity. The mother’s warning against female recipients of the kingly issue (wealth, vigour) has a double effect: it works to alert young people on the importance of right and wrong decisions for those involved including the subject of those decisions), but it also alerts us against stereotyped, biased depictions of women by women.

Keywords:   Proverbs 31:1–9, justice affected by wine consumption, leaders’ social responsibilities, female wisdom, gender solidarity, stereotyping of women

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