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Justice and Natural ResourcesAn Egalitarian Theory$
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Chris Armstrong

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780198702726

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2017

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780198702726.001.0001

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The Burdens of Conservation

The Burdens of Conservation

Chapter:
(p.220) 10 The Burdens of Conservation
Source:
Justice and Natural Resources
Author(s):

Chris Armstrong

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780198702726.003.0011

Justice surely requires the conservation of at least some resources. But when resources are conserved this can generate costs. This chapter discusses where those costs should fall. For instance, if we want to enjoy a safe climate, we ought to ‘leave (some of) the oil in the soil’. But doing so will set back the interests of those who currently rely on fossil fuel extraction for their livelihoods. The chapter draws out an account of when it is appropriate to pool these costs globally. One consequence is that a common picture of natural resource justice—under which agents or communities with valuable resources are taxed so as to shift funds in the direction of those without—is rendered more complex. In some cases, justice likely requires transfers in the direction of agents or communities who currently control valuable resources.

Keywords:   conservation, protection, restoration, non-exploitation, fossil fuels, rainforests, global justice

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