Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
The Oxford History of Protestant Dissenting Traditions, Volume IIThe Long Eighteenth Century c. 1689-c. 1828$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Andrew Thompson

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9780198702245

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: July 2018

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780198702245.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 13 December 2019

Toleration, Dissent, and the State in Britain

Toleration, Dissent, and the State in Britain

Chapter:
(p.263) 13 Toleration, Dissent, and the State in Britain
Source:
The Oxford History of Protestant Dissenting Traditions, Volume II
Author(s):

Andrew C. Thompson

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780198702245.003.0014

Dissenters within Britain had to face a range of challenges when it came to their relationship with the state. While the Toleration Act (1689) allowed Dissenters in England willing to subscribe to the doctrinal components of the Thirty-Nine Articles and swear allegiance to the monarch freedom of worship, they, like their counterparts elsewhere, still laboured under a series of legal restrictions that rendered them second-class citizens. Attempts were made throughout the period to remove these legal restrictions and organizations, such as the London-based Dissenting Deputies, were eventually successful in repealing the Test and Corporation Acts. The length of time that this took reflects the uncertainty about how easily the state could combine a desire for order with a divergence of opinions, religious or otherwise, within it.

Keywords:   Dissenting Deputies, Occasional Conformity, Salters’ Hall debates, Subscription, Test and Corporation Acts, Toleration Act

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .