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Other People's StrugglesOutsiders in Social Movements$
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Nicholas Owen

Print publication date: 2019

Print ISBN-13: 9780190945862

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: July 2019

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780190945862.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 14 October 2019

Problems of authenticity in expressive work

Problems of authenticity in expressive work

Chapter:
(p.94) 6 Problems of authenticity in expressive work
Source:
Other People's Struggles
Author(s):

Nicholas Owen

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780190945862.003.0006

Chapter 6 considers work in the expressive orientation, which concerns the articulation and expression of identities. The dilemma is one of authenticity, and it turns on questions of provenance. When the identity is grounded in shared experiences, needs, and desires, the adherent may be well placed to help. When the experiences, needs, and desires are unshared, she is a less possible and less useful ally. Three approaches are distinguished: disjoint “validation,” in which the adherent attests, on the basis of her expertise, that the claimed identity is valid; conjoint “crossing-over” in which the adherent seeks to share the identity-forming experiences of the constituents; and “self-expression,” in which constituents seek to secure their identities alone. The supporting case study for this chapter contrasts the mobilization of male sympathizers in the Edwardian women’s suffrage movement with their demobilization in the Women’s Liberation Movement of the 1970s.

Keywords:   conscience constituent, adherent, expressive orientation, identity, authenticity, validation, crossing over, self-expression, women’s suffrage, women’s liberation

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