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Human Flourishing in an Age of Gene Editing$
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Erik Parens and Josephine Johnston

Print publication date: 2019

Print ISBN-13: 9780190940362

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: August 2019

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780190940362.001.0001

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Do More Choices Lead to More Flourishing?

Do More Choices Lead to More Flourishing?

Chapter:
(p.99) 7 Do More Choices Lead to More Flourishing?
Source:
Human Flourishing in an Age of Gene Editing
Author(s):

Sheena Iyengar

Tucker Kuman

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780190940362.003.0008

Innovations in gene editing technology promise to increase the number of choices involved in the creation of future persons. The provision of more choices is commonly perceived as a boon to the individual chooser’s agency and ultimate satisfaction, but decades of work by social psychologists have lent more complexity to this picture, illustrating the ways in which the quality of our decision-making is susceptible to numerous forms of biases, errors, and complications that arise when our choice set is framed in a particular way or significantly expanded. A consideration of these potential consequences can help us better appreciate the stakes of gaining more choices in this highly unique context, suggesting that under certain circumstances more is sometimes less.

Keywords:   choice, choice overload, gene editing, choice optimization, decision-making, social psychology, flourishing

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