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Debating the SacramentsPrint and Authority in the Early Reformation$
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Amy Nelson Burnett

Print publication date: 2019

Print ISBN-13: 9780190921187

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2019

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780190921187.001.0001

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Reconstituting Authority

Reconstituting Authority

Chapter:
(p.282) 14 Reconstituting Authority
Source:
Debating the Sacraments
Author(s):

Amy Nelson Burnett

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780190921187.003.0014

Through the second half of the 1520s, cities and territories began to institutionalize reforms to the Lord’s Supper. Luther’s German Mass was influential in central and northern Germany, while the communion liturgies of Zurich and Basel were important as sacramentarian models. Church ordinances also contained sections on the Lord’s Supper, with the most important being the Instruction to the Visitors of Saxony and Bugenhagen’s Braunschweig ordinance. The Bern Disputation of 1528 generated a number of publications by both sacramentarians and Catholics; so, too, did the events leading to Basel’s abolition of the mass. The leaders of both parties could not reach agreement on the Lord’s Supper at the Marburg Colloquy, but the articles adopted there marked the emergence of a new source of collective authority: a confession of faith that defined orthodoxy.

Keywords:   liturgy, church ordinance, Bern Disputation, Marburg Colloquy, Lord’s Supper

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