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Richard I. Cohen

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9780190912628

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: August 2018

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780190912628.001.0001

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Sylvia Barack Fishman (ed.), Love, Marriage, and Jewish Families: Paradoxes of a Social Revolution. Waltham: Brandeis University Press, 2015. 340 pp.

Sylvia Barack Fishman (ed.), Love, Marriage, and Jewish Families: Paradoxes of a Social Revolution. Waltham: Brandeis University Press, 2015. 340 pp.

Chapter:
Sylvia Barack Fishman (ed.), Love, Marriage, and Jewish Families: Paradoxes of a Social Revolution. Waltham: Brandeis University Press, 2015. 340 pp.
Source:
Place in Modern Jewish Culture and Society
Author(s):
Richard I. Cohen
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780190912628.003.0043

This chapter reviews the book Love, Marriage, and Jewish Families: Paradoxes of a Social Revolution (2015), edited by Sylvia Barack Fishman. Love, Marriage, and Jewish Families deals with topics that intersect Jewishness, religion, nationality, gender and sexual identities, and life course perspectives. It shows that Jewishness cannot be understood without intersectional analysis of its national and cultural context (illustrated by the United States and Israel), religious context, its temporal context, and its life course context. Fishman explores the ways in which the U.S. and Israeli contexts are significantly different with regard to Jewish families and family orientations; how childrearing among gay and lesbian couples entails different challenges than among heterosexual couples; the added dimension to combining work and family in the case of religiously observant families; and how the overwhelmingly secular outside society can serve to empower haredi women in a shift toward egalitarianism.

Keywords:   Love, marriage, Jewishness, religion, nationality, life course, Jewish families, childrearing, haredi women, egalitarianism

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