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Political Science Research in the Middle East and North AfricaMethodological and Ethical Challenges$
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Janine A. Clark and Francesco Cavatorta

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9780190882969

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: July 2018

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780190882969.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 22 November 2019

Coding in Qualitative Research

Coding in Qualitative Research

Chapter:
(p.175) 15 Coding in Qualitative Research
Source:
Political Science Research in the Middle East and North Africa
Author(s):

Mohammad Yaghi

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780190882969.003.0015

In this chapter, Yaghi offers detailed suggestions on how to code qualitative data after they have been gathered. Based on his doctoral dissertation, this chapter explains that the logic behind coding qualitative data is to turn a significant amount of information into categories that can be used to explain a phenomenon, reveal a concept, or render the data comparable across different case studies. It also elaborates through examples from author’s fieldwork in Tunisia, Egypt, and Jordan on four potential problems that may face researchers in coding qualitative data. These are the questions of preparation, categorization, consistency, and saturation. The chapter concludes by asking researchers to be flexible, and open to the process of trial and error in coding, to confront the data with questions before categorization, and to gather sufficient data on their topics before running their qualitative surveys.

Keywords:   coding, qualitative data, categorization, saturation, Egypt, Tunisia, Jordan, youth

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