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In the Shadow of KorematsuDemocratic Liberties and National Security$
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Eric K. Yamamoto

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9780190878955

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: April 2018

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780190878955.001.0001

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Realpolitik Influences

Realpolitik Influences

Chapter:
(p.109) 7 Realpolitik Influences
Source:
In the Shadow of Korematsu
Author(s):

Eric K. Yamamoto

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780190878955.003.0008

This chapter identifies realpolitik influences on the implementation of the proposed method for judicial review. It dispels the formalist notion that the judicial embrace of the method—any method—will itself assure its faithful operation. The chapter acknowledges the importance of judicial methods both for case adjudication and for judicial legitimacy. But, in light of the “flux and pressure of contemporary events,” it also identifies a crucial role for legal advocates and the American populace. It posits that careful judicial scrutiny in practice often results from a ragged combination of law and politics. This chapter’s final section tightly illustrates the impact of this kind of advocacy and pressure in Dr. Wen Ho Lee’s national security prosecution debacle. Dr. Lee’s story uplifts the realpolitik insight that there “is a symbiotic relationship between politics and law, in which civil society’s appeal to law informs politics, and that politics reinforces the law’s appeal.”

Keywords:   method implementation, legal realism, critical theory, law and politics, judicial legitimacy, judicial accountability, critical legal advocacy, public pressure, Wen Ho Lee

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